Month: March 2014

Daily Inspiration 3-31-14

Daily Inspiration 3-31-14

“You cannot be lonely 
if you like the person 
you’re alone with.”

— Wayne Dyer 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #22 





Learning to love and appreciate myself. 

I’ve been practicing loving others for a large part of my life now, and I have made such progress in the art of allowing and learning to love unconditionally. It has been said that you cannot love others until you love yourself, but I just don’t agree with that. Still, that being said, I am and have been on the path of learning to really love myself, appreciate myself, respect myself, and most of that more recently.

I have bought into the I’m OK, you’re OK philosophy and have learned to accept myself and what skills and attributes I have in general, but really loving myself has been more of a challenge.

I bought several of Louise Hay’s books sometime back and she is all about learning to appreciate and love ourselves down to the body parts even. She has helped put some things in perspective, but I only recently began since my wife passed last August to actually practice looking sincerely in the mirror with aloud uplifting self-talk, along with reminding myself at different times throughout the day.

I don’t expect that I am alone in this. I know a lot of people that could use the same coaching I’ve been getting from Louise Hay and others. I think we all need to love ourselves more, accept ourselves more, be more true to ourselves. It’s easy to say I should love myself, but putting it into real practice is an other thing entirely. I’ve decided that the practice is way, way, way, overdue.

Louise Hay’s books, such as, You Can Heal Your Life, Heal Your Body, Love Yourself, Heal Your Life Workbook, Love Your Body, and so many others that she has written are extraordinary in their simplicity and straightforward approach and I have enjoyed them immensely. I also find them very helpful in developing an openness to practice and this is something worth practicing.

Whatever has gone on in the past, or wherever negative thoughts were first developed, it only matters that we make a decision to change it and the pathway will open before us with what we need to get there.

“Self-Worth Comes From One Thing: Thinking That You Are Worthy.” — Wayne Dyer 

Spread Some Joy Today–by loving and appreciating yourself. You are worthy.

Daily Inspiration 3-30-14

Daily Inspiration 3-30-14

“Life isn’t as serious 
as my mind makes it out to be.” 

— Eckhart Tolle 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #21 

Things and situations have no meaning when you’re gone. Personal loving connections have long-lasting meaning. 

I have come to believe that life was meant to be fun, interesting and enjoyable. As I develop more inner peace and intentionally decide to enjoy myself, I feel more alive and more fulfilled at the same time.

Eckhart Tolle said it clearly when he said, “What will be left of all the fearing and wanting associated with your problematic life situation that every day takes up most of your attention? A dash, one or two inches long, between the date of birth and date of death on your gravestone.”

It’s interesting when people close to you pass away and any of the problems, even all of the problems that you ever dealt with them about are no longer of the least importance. In fact, if all of the problems from a lifetime with that person were put in a pile, it would not even be a millimeter high. What matters is the good times, the times you connected, when you were both present in the present moment. The rest is worthless. Yet at the time, we made such a big deal out of them, even to the point of fighting, arguing, maybe yelling, maybe saying things that you didn’t really mean to say and more. For what? For a dash.

Then if there might be any guilt being carried about, things we should have or could have but didn’t, is all a bunch of feeling sorry for ourselves. It’s our bruised ego trying to stay in charge. Yet, all that is now zero importance too. We just need to let go of that rope and allow love to fill us and that is the perfect cure.

As we have issues in our daily lives, as the things seem to loom over our heads, we need to remember that it is our own thoughts that place the importance on them, and that we can choose to stay in the present, connect with each other, share love which is our natural being, and enjoy ourselves and each other. As important things go, this is as important as it gets.

You Get To Choose What Is And Will Be Important To You.

Spread Some Joy Today–Chill. Find something to put a deep smile on your face. Enjoy that moment. Savor it.

Daily Inspiration 3-29-14

Daily Inspiration 3-29-14

“Love what you do; 
Do what you love.” 

— Dr. Wayne Dyer 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #20 

Loving what I do is as important as breathing to me.

A long time ago, I read a book called, Do What You Love and the Money Will Follow by Marcia Sinetar. At the time I wasn’t exactly loving what I was doing and I was searching my mind for what I might like better and was looking for things like this book to help me find out. It really didn’t help me find out what it was, but it did help me to make a decision that I was going to do what I loved to do no matter what. And I did.

One of the other important things I wanted was as complete a freedom of time as I could find. So, by the law of attraction, I found both of these things. I didn’t have a clue until it happened and I could look backward enough to see it, and I think that is often the way things go. It was the decision of what I wanted that set things in motion and the rest came to be without me doing much of anything significant.

Until 1997, I had a work schedule. I had to be there at this time and off at that time with these days off, certain vacation times and so on. I always wanted to work out of my home and never could figure out how that would happen.

Here’s a place to remind long-time readers of this that I have a sign still on my wall to remind me the way to get things done. It says, “What is MY job. How is GOD’s job.” I decided what I wanted and even though I might never have figured it out on my own (because I gave it a lot of thought!), yet it came to pass. Since July 1997 I have worked out of my home. No office to go to, no schedule to maintain, no clock to punch, no time sheets to fill out, and here’s the best part: no supervision! If I work or don’t work, I have only me to answer to.

Trading money to have this kind of flexibility is an easy decision for me. Not everyone could make that decision, and not everyone would like what I like or what I do. That’s the beauty of life: we all are in charge of our own thing.

The schedule was one issue and that was solved. The other was doing what I loved and doing it with people I loved. Done. I love what I do. I love who I do it with. I love watching it unfold. I love not knowing so much about the future and just going with it. And, I’m always thinking of something else and see how I feel about that, or how to improve, expand, or whatever. That’s my favorite part.

Can we love what we do and have a great lifestyle too? Yes. I hope that yours is that way for you. I sure celebrate mine after 18 years enjoying it.

“Enjoying Life Is Far Superior To Being Graded On Your Performance In Life.” — Dr. Wayne Dyer 

Spread Some Joy Today–“The last suit that you wear, you don’t need any pockets.” — Dr. Wayne Dyer. Might as well spread some joy then!

Daily Inspiration 3-28-14

Daily Inspiration 3-28-14

“Right and wrong 
is purely a fantasy of the mind.” 

 — Albert K Strong 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #19 

There isn’t much space between judgment and justification.

For most of us, as with me, we are taught a whole lot of ways to make judgement. Right and wrong, good and bad, plus and minus, positive and negative, and a thousand shades and variations on this theme. But the thing that has impressed me the most, is learning that all of these judgments are just opinions. It may be my opinion that I learned from an authority figure, or from books, or church, but it is just an opinion. We make a decision that something is this way or that, when in reality it just is and all the rest of the labels we give it are totally made up.

In this respect, there is no such thing as right or wrong, good or bad, it just is what it is. Yet, when we label it and judge or justify as a result of our thinking of the label and what it means to us, that thing that just is will be turned into something much greater.

Then we have a tendency to justify more by seeking people with very similar opinions or judgments. And, it doesn’t matter how many ban together about the thing because it still is what it is, yet the fantasy of the thing continues to morph into something else.

The truth is that we decide what is right and wrong and good and bad and everywhere in between. And we can change that thought any time we like and see a different perspective–perhaps even the opposite perspective than we had known.

This fantasy of something being right and that people will all find it someday and know it as truth is far fetched. They will see whatever they see and decide whatever they will decide, while the thing is still the thing without any labels at all. Completely neutral.

Carl Jung said that “everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.” This idea has helped me to consider my irritation when it exists and to examine myself, or my thinking about that to try to understand better what is really going on.

Of course this goes both ways too. Sally Field said it well when she said, “It took me a long time not to judge myself through someone else’s eyes.” We can stand in judgement of others and we can also allow them to stand in judgment of us, and that is also often enough an interpretation based on not feeling good about ourselves.

We also often use different standards. For example, Ian Percy said that, “we judge others by their behavior. We judge ourselves by our intentions.” The ego sure doesn’t like to be anything except above the crowd, and perfect in every way.

I still judge people, things and events. I’m not certain that I will ever be completely free of it, and I mean this differently than discernment where I am making choices based on how I feel about something or someone. But, my awareness of this idea that right or wrong is just my opinion has helped me to tone down the righteousness and indignation, and even change my thinking mid-stream sometimes by reminding myself to pause and reflect a bit before passing judgment thoughtlessly, or by rote.

I Have A Lot Of Opportunities To Make Better Choices. I Need The Practice. 

Spread Some Joy Today–by showing your own. It’s unmistakable.

Daily Inspiration 3-27-14

Daily Inspiration 3-27-14

“Never begrudge the money 
you spend on your own education.” 

— Jim Rohn 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #18 

I am a life-long learner. I highly recommend it. 

I’ve spent tens of thousands of dollars on books over the years in my life. I didn’t even start reading books until after I was out of school and in my early twenties. While in school, except when I was in grade school, I used summaries and such to get through. Reading books cover to cover didn’t exist in my mind. My education began in all seriousness after I got out of school.

Even today after having given away most of my books, I have many hundreds left of my favorites, and a large collection of them are business related and biographies. I also have two Kindles and about 150 on there. I have loved books since I was a kid, and made a decision at about 22 years old to amass a nice library. On average in the last 20 years, I’ve probably read about a book a week, although I do have a tendency to go in spurts, so I might do 5 in a week and then none the next. I go with the flow.

Several things are quite clear to me at my age now. One is that I am so glad that I began reading books. I’ve enjoyed a knowledge I would not have known otherwise. Two, I’ve read a diverse mix of books. This has helped give me some perspective. I’ve often read books for and against a subject just to see the argument. I also have a tendency to immerse myself in a subject and read until I’ve had my fill. I remember getting into reading about the Civil War era, and reading many different things and biographies in that realm until I felt pretty full of it.

One subject I’ve never filled up on is commonly called personal development, but that is too narrow really. It encompasses psychology, self-help, spirituality, business and more. Probably the majority of what I’ve read is in this wide range of subjects.

I remember so well growing up hearing and reading about Abraham Lincoln reading in the dark or by candlelight if he had it. How books were hard to come by and how much they helped those who reached out for them. I have become the same way and Amazon.com and Barnes & Nobles has been dear friends in my pursuit. In fact, I discovered audiobooks back in 1988 and have bought and “read” many hundreds since then. My car is called my University on wheels.

In addition, I like to share books, so I’ve given many hundreds away over the last 15 years. Even now, my company buys a lot of books to give away to our team and to others in various ways. I’m committed to life-long learning and the benefits have been so worth it to me, that it seems silly not to share at least some of that passion. 

Learning To Read And Actively Practicing That Has Been My Greatest Gift To Myself. 

Spread Some Joy Today–Buy a book and read it!

Daily Inspiration 3-26-14

Daily Inspiration 3-26-14

“Some people you can afford 
to spend a few minutes with, 
but not a few hours.” 

— Jim Rohn 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #17 

Attitude, Influence, and Building Buildings. 

In the late 70s and into the 80s and beyond, I studied a man named Jim Rohn, who became quite a mentor to me though I never met him once in person. I read his books, listened to many of his tapes over and over wanting to fully absorb his down-home kind of philosophy. It was this idea of influence that he really brought home to me in a big way.

He said, “There are two parts to influence: First, influence is powerful; and second, influence is subtle. You wouldn’t let someone push you off course, but you might let someone nudge you off course and not even realize it.” He brought it home to me that “attitude is greatly shaped by influence and association.”

To help direct me, he suggested: “Get around people who have something of value to share with you. Their impact will continue to have a significant effect on your life long after they have departed.” And, thanks to Jim Rohn, this is so true about him. He has had a lasting impact on me and my thinking. I made real choices on purpose of whom I would spend time talking with and associating with.

I used to watch people hang around someone new and within a short time, they were talking like them, thinking like them, using similar mannerisms. It’s the copy cat thing, and it is real. If they are using a certain kind of slang, you can be sure that the new associate will begin to use the same slang with the same tones. It’s uncanny.

In older days, they referred to hanging around at the water cooler about how people would congregate and tell each other stories. More often than not, these stories were not complimentary, and that’s the kindest way to say it.

One of the best things I’ve ever learned from Jim is something that I have used so many times over the years and it has really helped me put things into perspective to see others and how they can be, but as well, to see myself and how I must pay attention to what I say and do. It is this: There are two ways to have the tallest building. One is to become known as a destroyer, and the other is to become known as a builder.

There were many, many times in my life when I would have to admit that I was a destroyer. The ego was run amok in me. I took what Jim said to heart, and I changed over time to become more of a builder. It’s so easy to put others down. Putting down the President, the government, the teachers, the supervisor or boss, the spouse, or mother or father, and more is so easy. It’s incredibly easy to be perfect and see all the faults in others, but that is not reality. However, as I consider the two building statement, I catch myself and speak positive, uplifting things about the others instead, and it may not change them, but it sure changes me for the better.

I’ll leave with one more great quote from Jim Rohn about association. “You must constantly ask yourself these questions: Who am I around? What are they doing to me? What have they got me reading? What have they got me saying? Where do they have me going? What do they have me thinking? And most important, what do they have me becoming? Then ask yourself the big question: Is that okay?”

I Choose To Be Around Positive, Uplifting People. 

Spread Some Joy Today–by considering your own value and capacity to love.

Daily Inspiration 3-25-14

Daily Inspiration 3-25-14

“I used to say, 
“I sure hope things will change.” 
Then I learned that the only way 
things are going to change for me 
is when I change.” 

 — Jim Rohn 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #16 

I can, and I will. I begin today! 

Jim Rohn adds, “Don’t say, “If I could, I would.” Say, “If I can, I will.” How many times have many of us said, “if only I could, I would?” The idea is that something is in the way stopping us, but it usually isn’t that at all, but more like not being nearly interested enough, or not believing that it is really possible to do that thing we think we want.

The truth is, when you think you can, you can, and when you decide you will, you will. Taking action always begins with thought. As Albert Einstein quipped, “the world as we have created it is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking.”

One of the biggest things I’ve learned about this whole idea of I can and I will is that I don’t have to see the whole thing completed as much as having a willingness to enjoy the unfolding of it and see where it goes. Dr. Martin Luther King said that “we don’t have to see the whole staircase to take the first step.”

Celebrate Your Ability, Willingness, And Activity. 

Spread Some Joy Today–Celebrate your ability and willingness to spread joy.

Daily Inspiration 3-24-14

Daily Inspiration 3-24-14

“Some persons are very decisive 
when it comes to avoiding decisions.” 

— Brendan Francis 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #15 

Making decisions, making them easily, and making them often. 

William James says it like it is when he said, “When you have to make a choice and don’t make it, that is in itself a choice.” I have to admit that this quote and the one above by Brendan Francis has me pegged more than I would like to admit. I’m such an artist at procrastination, and yet, of some of the people I know, I make a lot of decisions in comparison. But, that doesn’t ever help, does it? All we have is ourselves and comparing ourselves to others is often a cop-out, as it is in this case too.

“Life is the sum of all your choices,” according to Albert Camus and I have to agree with that. How could that not be? Every decision takes us to another place. And, if it weren’t for that, we would die where we stand.

There is some peace and satisfaction in the act of making a decision. Rita Mae Brown backs that up when she points out, “A peacefulness follows any decision, even the wrong one.” However, I used to believe there were wrong choices and right choices, but I do so no longer. There is only choices and each choice has some kind of response and whatever that is will be perfect for the time being. If we find the choice is less than satisfactory, we can make another, and another, and another.

The key is knowing what one wants I think. Once we zoom in on this, making decisions is much easier. When we don’t know what we want, how would a decision about anything help much? And, the whole idea about decisions is to begin, get moving, go somewhere, do something, right? Getting started is the natural next step once we know what we want.

We don’t need to know what we want forever, but right now is good enough. Lewis Carroll in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass says it as well as it can be said: “Go on till you come to the end; then stop.” Then is when a new decision will help us on our journey wherever we are going.

Buddha is attributed as saying, “There are two mistakes one can make along the road to truth. . . not going all the way, and not starting.” He also puts it in perspective when he said, “Everything that has a beginning has an ending. Make your peace with that and all will be well.”

So, I recommend making decisions often and not worrying very much about that. What comes of the decision will be telling, then we can make another choice. Indeed, we will soon enough have to make another choice to keep moving.

“With The New Day Comes New Strength And New Thoughts.” — Eleanor Roosevelt 

Spread Some Joy Today–by mirroring what Alexandra Stoddard said so nicely: “I wake up every morning with a great desire to live joyfully.”

Daily Inspiration 3-23-14

Daily Inspiration 3-23-14

“The greatest power 
is often simple patience.” 

— E. Joseph Cossman 


My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #14 

Patience is not only a virtue, it’s just plain fun.

I have learned to be a patient man, and I have learned it from people and circumstances that challenged me to make that choice. Well, I accepted the challenges with eagerness because I made a decision that I wanted to learn to be a patient man.

Some people think that having patience is enduring something, which sounds like that stiff-upper-lip thing in England. Patience in the Bible is often spoken in the same manner. To me that is more like tolerance, meaning you are putting up with it though you do not want to. Maybe you can’t even wait to get out of the situation to get back into the world of fast moving impatience.

I borrowed a bit of a quote from Wayne Dyer and created my own about this subject. Here it is: “Patience isn’t tolerating or putting up with. It is allowing things, situations, or people to be as they are without any insistence that they be anything else.” I think that says it nicely.

To me patience is also calmness. I remember several years ago when I first read a quote by James Allen, and as soon as I read it, the whole thing resonated with me and I wanted to become that person. Here’s the quote: “The more tranquil a man becomes, the greater is his success, his influence, his power for good. Calmness of mind is one of the beautiful jewels of wisdom.” Isn’t that a wonderful image? I love it.

All of these are great. Each is well spoken and describes the idea of patience nicely. From the time I was a child, I had always heard the quote, “patience is a virtue.” I never really knew what it meant, and putting it into practice was torture. Later in my life, after finally making a decision that I wanted to become a patient man, I found that practice was what helped me get it going, and after a time, I began to have fun with it, and now I look forward to opportunities where I can practice it.

But, before I could really practice it, I had to get rid of the idea of tolerance, endurance, holding my breath, and other ideas of patience. What I found was that it was more real when I would unplug from the situation, suspend all judgment, and the key word was to relax.

So, I went back to my vision of the tug-o-war and my struggle to pull the rope was my impatience with the situation or the person, and patience was more obvious to me as in letting go of the rope. I began to practice as if I were standing outside just watching the situation with no real interest other than to just enjoy it. That worked extremely well.

My stepping back, letting go of the rope and just observing brought me joy. I was really having fun and smiling the whole time. Others around me might be complaining, demonstrating their impatience and so on, and here I was in the same situation, having joy. Who knew? It’s hard to say how much of a difference it has made in my recent life, but it is tremendous. 

“Circumstance Does Not Make The Man; It Reveals Him To Himself.” — James Allen 

Spread Some Joy Today–Let go of the rope. Relax. Breathe deeply. Experience joy.

Daily Inspiration 3-22-14

Daily Inspiration 3-22-14

“Something remarkable 
 is worth talking about. 
Worth noticing. 
 Exceptional. 
 New. 
 Interesting. 
It’s a Purple Cow. 
Boring stuff is invisible. 
It’s a brown cow.” 

 — Seth Godin 
My Life Lessons 

This is a series of revelations about my life that I am sharing with others for what it may be worth. These come from a lifetime of study and experience of others and myself, and I now translate them to words. These will be numbered; however, they are not in order of importance as all are equally important. It is just a way for me to keep track of them in this series. I hope you find value in them.

Life Lesson #13 

Competition, Purple Cows, The Pie, and Cooperation.

I don’t believe in competition. It wouldn’t matter much to me how many were in business in the same town with the same service or product. I know that there are a lot of people who don’t agree with me and who do believe in the idea of competition, or the dog eat dog idea of survival of the fittest.

After all, they claim, the pie is only so big and we gotta get our share before the other guy. We gotta focus on market share and we need more of the market share and all that baloney. If, as they claim, the pie is only so big, then it would be true that the only way for me to have more is to take it from someone else so they would have less. It’s just mathematics at this point.

I do believe in Purple Cows. Seth Godin wrote a wonderful book in 2002 called Purple Cow. Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable. It’s not about stealing from others, it is about creating something remarkable that others will want. Fortunately, there are many ways to do that and it is only limited by ones creativity and desire. While some may focus here, all we have to do is focus there and that changes everything. I teach this exact thing in how to manage a great commercial truck department. It’s about being remarkable and innovation.

Also, rather than the idea of competition, I prefer cooperation. It’s a foreign concept in the field I spent most of my life in. Car dealerships pretend to thrive on competition. I call it competing over the lowest gross profit, and they call it market share leadership. Yet, I have proven to myself many times over that by encouraging cooperation rather than competition, we all win.

This brings me to The Pie. Competition believes the pie is limited and so the only way to increase your share of the pie, you must take market share from someone else, and the more you take, the more leadership you enjoy. Cooperation believes that the pie is not fixed and that it actually expands by virtue of cooperation. In this case, everyone can have more if they want it and they do not have to take anything from anyone else.

I have instituted and promoted cooperation with other auto dealers, other body companies, other businesses since about 1979, and have grown stronger in my support of that idea from the massive successes I’ve had by practicing it. There are so many ways to do this, and help others at the same time. I worked for one truck body company and sold many so-called competitive makes at the same time by trying my best to help the end user get what they needed or my dealers get what they wanted for their clients. I didn’t get paid directly for selling the competitive bodies, but in the long run, I benefited sufficiently by helping get the job done for my clients and their customers. That is cooperation–even if others don’t actually cooperate, if you know what I mean by that.

James Cash Penney (J.C. Penney to most), said it this way: “A merchant who approaches business with the idea of serving the public well has nothing to fear from the competition.” I also like Franklin D. Roosevelt’s quote: “Competition has been shown to be useful up to a certain point and no further, but cooperation, which is the thing we must strive for today, begins where competition leaves off.”

“What Is The Difference Between Competition And Cooperation? The Outcome.” — Albert K Strong 

Spread Some Joy Today–Personal Thank You cards are old school. But they are so well received.

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